Georgia Tech Admission Blog (2024)

Playing to Win vs. Playing Not to Lose

You may not have been following Georgia Tech football in recent years. Suffice it to say, it’s been rough. Rough– as in three consecutive three-win seasons. If you are not an American football fan, it’s important to note- there are a lot more than three games in a season. Last month I walked by a man and his family looking at the field and overheard him say, “When I went here they played football down there. Now I hear they host some good concerts.” So, bottom line- not good.

As a result, a little over a week ago, our head coach was fired, and assistant head coach and Tech alumnus Brent Key was named interim coach. In his first statement to the press, Coach Key stressed the importance of playing to win versus playing not to lose. His point was our players were worried something would go wrong and were playing tight as a result. He wanted them to feel empowered to make things happen versus waiting for things to happen. Well…in his first game as head coach, the Yellow Jackets (a double-digit underdog) traveled to Pittsburgh and beat the #24 Panthers. Clearly, Coach Key had unlocked (yea, I went there) something in his players.

If you are a senior, my hope is you will also play to win versus playing not to lose in college admission and your final year of high school as well. Here’s what that looks like.

  1. Trust yourself. Playing to win means believing in your preparation, intuition, and ability. Lots of seniors right now are stressed about their essay with EA/ED deadlines looming. Listen- you can write. And you have valuable stories to tell and perspective to share. There is no perfect essay topic, so don’t let that give you anxiety. Admission readers want specifics from you. They want to read something uniquely yours. Playing not to lose would be convincing yourself you need more multi-syllabic words or angsting over possibly missing a comma splice. Playing to win means being prepared, I.e. writing multiple drafts, having one or two others give you feedback, and then hitting submit with the confidence that you have done your best work.

In the year ahead, I also hope you will trust yourself when it comes to the colleges you chose to apply to and those you decide not to pursue. To hear yourself you may have to tune out other voices. When you are deferred, waitlisted, or denied, trust other good things are coming your way. Success in college admission is not getting into your “top choice,” but being prepared, excited to play, and ready to take advantage of the opportunity wherever you end up. Playing to win will mean quiet confidencewhen the day comes to put your deposit down or close apps at other schools. Trusting yourself means knowing the choice is authentically yours.

I hope your senior year is characterized by building friendships, preparing academically, and enjoying a unique time you’ll never be able to repeat. Take time to thank and appreciate the people around you who believe in you.

2. Be Proactive. In the Pitt game and going forward, Coach Key wants his players to make plays, rather than waiting for the game to come to them. Good high school students, good college applicants, and good college students do the same thing. What is not done today that you need to take care of? Are you procrastinating on finishing your application? Figure out what it’s going to take and execute that plan. Are you nervous or unclear about what test optional really means at a college you are considering? Reach out to them. Do you need a teacher to write a rec letter for you, or your neighbor who is an English teacher to look over your essay? TODAY is the day! The college admission experience, if you will let it, can teach you lessons about how to succeed in college and beyond. Playing not to lose means hoping, worrying, and being tight or nervous. Playing to win means being proactive.

I hope this is how you approach the rest of your senior year too. A year from now your parents, teachers, coaches, boss, andthe other supporting adults in your life won’t be there in the exact way they are currently. Are you waiting on them to provide, guide, decide, or drive? I hope you won’t spend the year looking around waiting for others to create opportunities for you. To make a play you must move. What do you have to lose when you are playing to win?

3. Have fun. I Googled fun and did not see pictures of people answering short answer prompts, brainstorming essay topics, or taking standardized tests. But let’s flip the script here. You don’t have to apply to college. Unlike the vast majority of the world’s population, you get to apply to college. We often call it an admission process, and that can make it feel like a grind. I believe that term makes this all seem transactional versus being transformational. Don’t lose sight of the big picture here. If you are reading this, YOU ARE GOING TO COLLEGE. That’s amazing! That’s exciting. Where? I don’t know. You don’t know. So, yea, there’s some uncertainty and mystery. Again, flip the script. Instead of that being what has you nervous, get excited and commit to having fun with the adventure of discovering.

Ok. Let’s play this out and assume you won’t get into a couple of theschools you apply to. Playing to win does not mean everything goes your way or you control every down or play. Instead, it means you are on the field. You are in the arena. You get to see how and where your preparation, effort, ability, intuition, and excitement lead. That. Is. FUN.

And again, same for your senior year. Enjoy. Have fun. Laugh, smile, do things you want to do. For the love of all things holy don’t let college admissions dominate this final year of high school. Playing to win means being relaxed, confident, trusting yourself, being proactive, and absolutely having fun. And, as always, hug your mama.

Will Tech beat Dook (you run your spellcheck and I’ll run mine) on Saturday? I am not putting $ Down. But I know they’ll be playing to win- and I’m hoping the same for you in the days, months, and year ahead.

Top 3 Reasons NOT to Trust Rankings

This week the US News and World Report rankings of colleges came out. Over the years, I have written extensively about this topic, in order to put them in perspective and point away from the list and more toward the methodology, i.e. how they are formulated.

Here is what I know.

  • Your time is limited. Between friends, school, work, practice, studying, and the basics of eating and sleeping, you are busy.
  • College- and college admission can feel overwhelming. Lots of colleges, lots of opinions, lots of money. Lots.
  • Rankings simplify things. On some level, we all desire this, right? Amidst the swirl of sources, the deluge of data, and the whirlwind of words around college, a list is refreshing. A clean, easy, simple cascading enumeration is like a healing balm.

I get it. I hear you. You’re not crazy. But it is ironic at best and hypocritical at worst to put any stock in the rankings, because it’s the opposite of how you want colleges to consider your applications—or for the overall admission process to be conducted.

In no particular order, here’s how I see it.

  1. More than a number (cue The Drifters). As a college applicant, you expect the colleges will not see you purely as a number. You don’t want them to boil your high school experience down to a cell on a spreadsheet, draw a hard cut off line on SATs, or assume your GPA absolutely defines you. Instead, you expect schools will use context and nuance as they review your application. As a senior, that’s why you are drafting, second guessing, and asking for opinions about your essay right now, isn’t it? (Yes. I see you.) You want them to see you in full. Return the favor.

When you draw hard lines and only visit or apply to schools in the Top X or Y from a list, or select a college simply because it’s ranked higher than another one to which you have been admitted, it gives way too much credit to the methodology on which these numbers are derived, and artificially distills countless qualitative factors and dynamics. As I have said before, good college applicants think like good college students and dig into any number, percentage, or statistic they find to understand the source, and determine it’s validity.

  1. Gameable. It’s been a few years since Varsity Blues (aka The Admission Scandal), and we’ve endured a global pandemic since then, so it may be fuzzy in your mind. Ultimately, what made the public so upset about this situation was that wealthy, connected parents were gaming the system in order to get their kids into particular schools. It was not fair. It was not ethical. As an applicant, you expect other students will not hack into the admission database, bribe admission officers, or influence college administrators in order to change their result in the process.

And you don’t want this to occur on a systemic level either. I know this because whether I’m in Georgia, California, abroad or anywhere in between, students and families are consistently worried “the school down the street” is inflating grades or getting an advantage because of some misperception of quality.

To put it gently, the rankings are very gameable at the micro and macro level. Check out Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, Revisionist History, The Lord of the Rankings, in which he details the work of Dr. Kelly McConville and her team of statisticians who enumerate specific tactics colleges employ to increase their position through strategic decisions. The truth is they don’t scratch the surface of the myriad ways ways to implement slight adjustments in class sizes, course naming conventions, faculty pay, or even the way you report and categorize numbers around the fringes, i.e. clinical changes, which have no bearing on the actual student experience.

In my career, I have personally known numerous admission deans who have been hired and fired based on their willingness, or lack thereof, to organize their operations (and their actual admission decisions) to boost a university’s spot. It’s one thing to have game, my friend. Gamey and Gaming- alsodifferent. The rankings are gameable. They are actively being gamed.

  1. Opinions vs. stats. Imagine you walked into class on the first day of school and Mrs. Bertha Ormse begins passing out the course syllabus. Slowly and repeatedly pulling and pinching her chin, she announces in her gravely voice, “On page 1-2, you can see what we will be learning this fall in US History 1800-1910.”

Scanning quickly you pick up the high points: Western expansion, War of 1812, Missouri Compromise, Monroe Doctrine, rise of railroads, Trail of Tears, Civil War, Reconstruction, Industrial Revolutoin. Nodding in agreement you think, “Makes sense. I’ve heard of most of this.”

Interrupting your ruminations, she continues matter-of-factly, “Page 3 outlines how you will be graded.”

Quizzes, homework, tests, projects = 80% of final grade.

“Ok. Ormse. I see you. I mean, I may have weighted quizzes a little less, but…” And then… “No. Certainly not. Wait… the final 20% of my grade is based on… opinion of other students.” 20%?!

That’s right. Your fellow students, who have a vested interest in their own scores and ultimate position in the class, will make up 1/5 of your final grade.

You start looking around anxiously and suddenly your mind shifts into overdrive.

Who is that kid in the second row? I’ve never seen him in my life.

Oh, no. Zach. He has always hated me ever since that thing with the guy at the place back in third grade.

Crap. Sarah. Everyone loves her. She’s…she’s…she’s…all the things I’m not. But does that make her better at history? Does that make her better than me in general?

Well…when the opinion of others accounts for 20% of the grade—probably.

And that’s how it goes for colleges with the rankings. 20% is based on the opinions of others. Others in the same game. Others in the same class. Others with vested interests in their own results and position.

Raise your hand if you’d like 20% of your admission decision to be based on the other applicants opinions of you. Ok. You can put your hand back down now. Oh, and to be clear, in most cases they’ve never met you, seen you, or have anything concrete to go on except where you are from and a vague recollection that a few years ago someone they met said you were “Ok.”

Bottom line: I earnestly think you are smarter than the gamemakers at US News. And I know you know youbetter than they ever could.So is itcrazy to suggest you creating your own ranking system? More on that here.

Rank the Rankings

Colleges want you to apply because you have done your homework and believe you match up well academically and beyond the classroom. They send you brochures, email you invitations to come to campus, and even travel to your town or high school in hopes they can tell you a full story about their history, mission, offerings, and ethos. You apply to colleges expecting them to look beyond your name or test score. Holistic review is time intensive and deeply human. It’s not perfect, but it strives to be comprehensive. I’m just asking the same from you in your consideration of the rankings.

How to WIN College Admission

Get out your pen or phone because I’m only going to go through this once.

To get into any college in the country, you need to follow these steps exactly.

Note: It is important you complete each task in listed order. Failure to include one of these on your application negates the guarantee.

  1. Take AP Physics
  2. Volunteer as a translator at your local hospital
  3. Use either bucolic or grandiose in the opening line of your essay (ideally both)
  4. Score at least 70 points higher than your current score on the SAT

Excellent. Now, be sure you say this to yourself every day, and post it on social media more than twice but no more than four times each month, “I will only be happy if I attend (insert your top choice here).”

As you know, visualization is a powerful tool. Athletes, actors, prominent speakers, and other top performers use this strategy in preparation for achieving excellence, and you need to do the same thing in your college admission/application process. So, close your eyes and imagine yourself at your dream school. Think about walking around campus, eating in the dining hall, laughing boisterously with friends, and hashtagging #BestLifeEver on a daily basis.

You are killing this exercise. Well done. This time close your eyes and imagine yourself at any other college. Think about the disaster this would be. Tears, ruin, and utter carnage should be filling your mind and thoughts. Forget posting on social media in this place. Your fingers will be trembling, internet will be intermittent if functional at all, and all of your friends will have unfollowed you anyway.

Parents/ Supporting adults– I don’t want to leave you out of the fun. Think back on your student’s life to this point. You’ve always known success and happiness to be monolithic. That’s how your life has played out, and it’s what you’ve seen repeatedly in your friends too. One path to success- and a specific college determines EVERYTHING.

Consider when they were little. All of the parenting books said you should only let them pretend to be one thing, and you followed that advice verbatim. One outfit, one sport, one interest to pursue. You’ve spent so long limiting them and pigeonholing them, but now everything is on the line. This is a test of your mettle. Welcome to the show. Their future- and yours hinges on this- college. Don’t falter and DO NOT relent! Keep pushing them towards one absolute outcome.

And for the love of all things holy don’t let others distract you with stories of unexpected joy or alternatives to your master plan for your child’s life. You know as well as I do that college is a zero-sum game. Winners and losers. If your kid does not go to X College, not only will their life be over, yours (which thankfully will be much shorter anyway) will be too.

Final Advice

  • Rankings are the gospel truth. Follow them blindly as you do all other things you read online. Don’t question their methodology or buy the false narrative purporting that they are really only about clicks and marketing dollars. Think about it- if a school went up five spots or dropped three this year, it is because they are fundamentally different places than they were last year. Draw hard lines. This is war.
  • Trust YouTube, TikTok, Reddit implicitly. If a kid says she got into Yale because of the essay she wrote, that’s exactly what happened. Listen closely to her advice and subscribe to that channel for sure. Also, share it with your friends and encourage them to like it- they really will.
  • There is a direct correlation between your chances of getting into a school that admits 10% or fewer of its applicants and the number of those colleges you apply to. I mean that’s just math, folks.
  • Holistic Admission is BS. You need to make a higher score on the SAT, even if they say they’re test blind/free/optional. Go pay a lot of money, spend an exorbitant number of hours practicing, wake up each Saturday at 6 a.m. just to acclimate, and tattoo your necessary score on your wrist. We all know standardized tests are going to help you immensely as a college student. The highest scorers in the NFL combines always pan out to be the best players in the league. Same same.
  • Schools in the same athletic conference are identical. Apply to all of them.

Do all of this and you will Win in College Admission. Do it not and…

Time to Shine

This week we welcome Regional Director of Admission for the Mid Atlantic, Kathleen Voss, to the blog. Welcome, Kathleen!

Do you remember the episode of Modern Family when Phil and Claire drop Haley off at college? They are OVER the top all day, even wearing “Haley Dunphy Moving Company” t-shirts. Haley is mortified and begs her dad to take off the t-shirt lest they be judged by all the other kids and their families moving into the residence hall. Other embarrassing antics happen throughout the episode, and as Phil and Claire sit in silence on their drive home, Haley calls and tells them she loves them and thanks them. The audience sees she is wearing her “Haley Dunphy Moving Company” t-shirt. Not a dry eye in the house.

As you may recall, my daughter starts college this fall. This past weekend her dad, sister, and I traveled 3.5 hours south to her new home. I should have known when my husband and youngest daughter started getting carsick as we bobbed and weaved over the country and mountain roads that a Century City-produced college drop-off was NOT in the cards for us.

One Last Hoorah

As an attempt to bring us all together for one last hurrah before the big day (think Oliver Stone assembling the cast to experience basic training before he started shooting Platoon). I organized a family trip to a lovely, local hotel near the university. It had been the site of a famous movie, starring an 80’s heartthrob, the perfect preamble to our College Drop-Off Spectacular!

Unfortunately, while a beautiful spot, the first raindrop fell as we unpacked the car, and the torrents began soon after. The scenes of family hikes to waterfalls and loving, heartfelt conversations sitting poolside would have to be reshot. EASY! We would just move the location into the hotel room.

Georgia Tech Admission Blog (7) While well appointed, the room was small and since my husband had forgotten his CPAP machine at home (queue sound effects), none of us had gotten much sleep the night before (nor did we the entire time). Tensions on the set were running high and the constant questions I peppered my college-bound daughter with (“Did you get your room pin?” “Do you know where we need to park?” “How long do we have to actually move in?” “Do they have carts or dollies?”) were soon met with an 18-year old’s wrath, which includes rolling eyes and deep exasperated breaths that started in her toes and rumbled through her rib cage … Stanislavski would be proud!

The supporting cast was just as motivated! Not to be outperformed, the 13-year-old commentary, (“GAAAAWDDD Mom! Can’t you talk about something else?” “I’m BORED” “The Wi-Fi sucks here” and “Can we get ice cream?” for the 200thtime) was just as impactful. My script writer really deserves a raise.

Move-In Day

At last, the time came for move-in. The costumes were chosen with care (seriously, my husband chose a “move in” costume. “It must be lightweight, breathable, easy to get around in. Maybe coveralls? I should also wear closed-toe shoes… did I bring my Carhartts?”). We made our way into the crowd of fellow thespians to the 10th floor of a tower that was built the year I was born. And believe me, no hair and make-up team were going to make IT or I, look any younger.

We got to the door and waited and waited some more. Someone, who prefers to remain nameless, never got their pin (I know, I can’t believe it either). So, a trip down the elevator, a visit to the RA desk and back up we went. As we entered the prop closet… I mean dorm room; the REAL fun began. It immediately became a race to the Academy Awards, each actor outdoing the next in testing exactly how HIGH emotions could get. Crying? Check. Swearing? Check. Check. Shouting? Check. Luckily, the four fans that my husband had set up across the room “to maximize airflow” DID help drain out the volume of our dialogue. At least we hope it did.

Time to Say “So Long”

After three hours of lofting and un-lofting beds, moving bookcases and desks, dusting, unpacking far too many clothes, storing luggage, and cutting open vacuum-packed rugs and mattress pads (a must by the way) we had successfully dressed the set. And it was time to say goodbye.

Georgia Tech Admission Blog (8)The Director had envisioned this final scene in her mind in the weeks leading up to our departure. I would hold it together, share a sage word or two of final wisdom, pull out a starched, lace handkerchief (or Kleenex, probably easier) to dab at that tear on my cheek, hug the main character close, wish her well, offer a loving goodbye and then drive off down the tree-lined, college lane.

The Kleenex part will probably make it into the final episode, but the ugly crying, weeping, sobbing, and seemingly never-ending nose blowing that followed, will be left on the cutting room floor. I pulled it together about an hour from our house.

I was thinking about that Modern Family episode. Phil had left Haley a book with advice and “dad-isms.” My favorite was, “never be afraid to reach for the stars, because even if you fall, you’ll always be wearing your parent chute.” There was nothing left for me to do. My sweet, energetic, athletic, bright Star was ready to shine. On her own. I had seen the excitement in her eyes as we walked the campus and again as we said goodbye. I had felt the independence, like the pull of the sun, as she directed her dad where to put the unlofted/lofted/unlofted bed and suggested a spot for us to eat lunch.

And while I may not be ready, she is. And the stage is hers.

Georgia Tech Admission Blog (9)Kathleen Voss has worked in college admission for over 25 years. She joined the Georgia Tech Office of Undergraduate Admission in 2013 as the Institute’s first Regional Director of Admission. Prior to Tech, Kathleen worked regionally for Manhattan College and as the Associate Director of Admission for Regis College in Massachusetts. She is a member ofPCACACand serves on the Admission Practices Committee. She enjoys spending time with her husband and two daughters and volunteering in her community.

What are your admission requirements? Part II

Our last blog was geared toward helping students applying to college keep an open mind about their choices and options, and ensure they have a solid support system around them. I am hopeful students actually read the piece and will take my advice to heart, because the only emails I received afterward were from parents.

Their messages centered around the response I used to give students when I first started at Tech in the early 2000s when asked, “What are your admission requirements?” READ: Please just tell me clearly and plainly what I need to do/have to get in?

My response was simple, honest, and easy, “Sure. Get a 3.7 GPA, 1300 SAT, write a few lines on your essay, do some stuff outside the classroom, and we’ll see you in the fall.”

The blog went on to explain why a 3.7 (or 3.5 or 4.0) of twenty years ago is not uniform anymore, and as a result admission reps from competitive universities are rarely able to provide a single sentence (let alone a single number) when discussing GPAs. Parents who emailed wanted to know if SAT/ACT scores are equivalent to the early 2000s (or before I assume), and how much stock to put in the averages or ranges they hear in presentationsor see published online.

Whether these questions stemmed from innocent curiosity or an attempt to settle a household debate/competition, I am unsure. And while I did not intend to write a Part II it does provide a timely opportunity to identify admission requirements for parents as they coach and partner with their students.

First, here is an attempt to answer the question.

Is a 1300 (sticking with the cited example) the same as it was 20 (or 30) years ago?

As with most answers in admissions land, “It depends.”

The Same Scale. The SAT is still comprised of two sections for a total of 1600 points (though there was a brief time period when it was comprised of three 800-point sections- totaling 2400).

The Same Percentile. An SAT score of 1300 puts a student in the top 14% of test takers, which is roughly equivalent to where it was 20 years ago. However, there are far more students taking the SAT/ACT now, so the raw number of takers above and below any score is higher.

Likely Different in that most colleges “super score” tests- meaning during admission review (and ultimately when they publish scores) they are on students’ highest combined total of the two sections from any test administration. Twenty years ago, colleges were generally not publishing super-scored averages or ranges, and students did not have the option of score choice- opting out of sending particular tests to colleges. The combination of these two practices has served to inflate the scores colleges include on publications, websites, etc.

Particularly Different for anyone who took the SAT prior to 1995- the year the College Board “re-centered” the test.

Arguably Different in that on average twenty years ago students took the test fewer times and had less access to free/low-cost/or absurdly high-cost test preparation.

Optionally Different in that data suggests students scoring lower than published institutional averages/ranges are less likely to submit their test scores to colleges with test optional policies, thus increasing averages/ranges on profiles, common data sets, etc.

Recently Different in that many testing centers have been closed and testing administrations canceled. Over the last few years during the pandemic, students have taken these tests in abnormal circumstances impacted and varying drastically based on their local environment.

The truth is the testing landscape is vaster and more confusing than ever, and that’s without addressing how factors like Early Decision, financial need, residency, major, or other demographics may impact how a particular student’s SAT/ACT score is viewed in any given college’s admission review process.

What are your admission requirements?

Cleary, I cannot speak for every college. And unlike my early days at Tech, I cannot give you two numbers or a formula to guarantee admission. But after two decades of watching this cycle repeat itself, I can still make you a promise. If you are a parent or supporting adult who just loves your kid and wants to see them be successful in their college admission (and college) experience, I can tell you what you need to do and have. Here are your admission requirements.

DO stay one chapter ahead. I want to urge you to talk less to parents of other high school seniors and more to parents of college students or recent college graduates. When kids are little, we looked to parents a chapter ahead for advice, solace, and perspective. Don’t forget the value they add, particularly during the college admission experience.

Perhaps your friends and neighbors are different, but often parents of other high school seniors exaggerate, proliferate, propagate, and other ates and gates that are typically unhealthy/unhelpful. Talk to those folks about the upcoming game, play, or school event, but when conversations about where students are applying, or where they either do or do not get in, etc. try subtly changing the subject. In my experience, avoiding the speculation or hearsay and generally keeping your family’s admission process private is not only good for your personal well-being and mental health, but for your relationship with your student too.

HAVE early, open, and honest conversations about money. My sincere hope is you will commit to having transparent conversations with your student now- before they submit applications. Being open about how much you either can, or are willing to pay, is a gift because it sets expectations at an appropriate time.

Does this mean you are saying they cannot apply to X college? Absolutely not. But it helps your student clearly understand the financial aid package or scholarship level they will need to receive in order to enroll. Delaying this discussion until after a student is admitted is a disservice to everyone involved, because an offer of admission will already be emotional on some level. Parents frequently underestimate their students’ ability to handle transparent conversations about finances, lifestyle, and how paying for colleges enters the equation. If you open the books and explain why you have certain conditions or limitations on paying for college, you’ll likely be surprised and proud at how they approach their applications and ultimate college selection.

What are YOUR admission requirements?

In Part 1 for students, I encouraged them to focus on what they need and want from a university experience, rather than on what a college seems to require of them in the admission process. I adamantly believe if they will take some time to write down and really consider this question, it will help as they think through their choices and options at every stage. It will likely also help rule out places that don’t align, and it will give them good questions to ask when they visit, talk to reps, or receive admission offers and are weighing their options.

I hope you will do the same. For this exercise, forget the names of colleges, their ranking, or any stereotypes, biases, or attachments you may have. Instead, just think of your student. You know them better than anyone else- you’ve watched them grow, change, and learn along the way. What do you think is most important to helping them thrive academically and to be healthy outside of the classroom? Coming up with even a short list of these qualities or characteristics will enrich and balance your conversations, recommendations, questions, and support along the way.

As parents its easy to feel pressure to have answers and solutions for our kids. But when it comes to college admission, seeking perspective, being honest and open, reflecting, listening, and walking through the experience together is perhaps the biggest gift we can give.

Georgia Tech Admission Blog (2024)

FAQs

What is the acceptance rate for Georgia Tech 2022? ›

Georgia Institute of Technology admissions is most selective with an acceptance rate of 18% and an early acceptance rate of 23.6%. Half the applicants admitted to Georgia Institute of Technology have an SAT score between 1360 and 1540 or an ACT score of 31 and 35.

What day do Georgia Tech Decisions come out? ›

First-Year Admission Deadlines
Application Plan2023 Application DeadlineDecision Release
Early Action 1 Georgia Students OnlyOctober 17December 9
Early Action 2 Non-Georgia Students OnlyNovember 1Late January
Regular DecisionJanuary 4March

What is the average acceptance GPA for Georgia Tech? ›

The average high school GPA for admitted students at Georgia Tech is 3.8 on a 4.0 scale. (You can calculate your high school a GPA here.) This is a very competitive GPA, and Georgia Tech is clearly accepting students at the top of their high school class.

Does Georgia Tech do interviews for admissions? ›

No. Interviews are not part of the admission process at Georgia Tech.

What ACT score is needed for a full ride to Georgia Tech? ›

There's no absolute ACT requirement at Georgia Tech, but they really want to see at least a 31 to have a chance at being considered.

Is Georgia Tech difficult to get into? ›

As you might have already noticed through your college research, Georgia Tech is a competitive school. In fact, Georgia Tech's acceptance rate is a mere 23.4%, meaning admissions are highly competitive.

Is Georgia Tech waitlist first come first serve? ›

Once a student has waitlisted for a course section, they will receive notification via email if a seat becomes available in that section. Waitlisted students are notified on a "first-come-first-serve" basis, and once the notification is received, they will have a specified window of time to register for the course.

How does Georgia Tech notify acceptance? ›

Undergraduate Admission uses email and your admission portal as the ONLY communications tools for admission related updates. Please check your email settings to be sure emails from admission@gatech.edu can be safely delivered to your account.

When should I expect admission decisions? ›

You should expect to hear back from schools by the first week of April. Why? Because of the May 1 timeline that colleges and universities rely on. With that said, there is a chance you won't hear an official decision until the summer.

What kind of students get into Georgia Tech? ›

With a GPA of 4.07, Georgia Tech requires you to be at the top of your class. You'll need nearly straight A's in all your classes to compete with other applicants. Furthermore, you should be taking hard classes - AP or IB courses - to show that college-level academics is a breeze.

Can I get into Ga Tech with a 1200 SAT? ›

A candidate must have a 1465 average SAT score. An applicant must have a minimum ACT composite score of 31.5. An applicant must have a GPA of -3.8 on average.

Is Georgia Tech prestigious? ›

The Georgia Tech College of Engineering continues to be recognized as an elite engineering school and one of the top public institutions in the nation. The undergraduate engineering program at the College ranked 4th in the 2023 America's Best Colleges edition of U.S. News & World Report (published in September 2022).

How many people get off Georgia Tech waitlist? ›

Table updated March 22, 2021
InstitutionApplicants placed on waitlistStudent accepted from waitlist
George Washington University6187163
Georgetown University327729
Georgia College & State University20
Georgia Institute of Technology-Main Campus6214853
121 more rows

Does your major affect admission at Georgia Tech? ›

We ask you to do that because consideration of your major is an important part of our application review process, as we seek to ensure an academically diverse first-year class.

What is the easiest way to get into Georgia Tech? ›

How to Improve Your Chances of Getting into Georgia Tech
  1. Achieve at least a 4.09 GPA while taking the most challenging classes available. ...
  2. Aim for a 1520 SAT and 35 ACT. ...
  3. Cultivate at least one or two Tier 1-2 extracurriculars (find your “spike”) ...
  4. Write engaging essays. ...
  5. Apply early action.
18 Sept 2021

Does Georgia Tech look at weighted or unweighted GPA? ›

GPA Evaluation Criteria

The GPA we consider is the one taken directly from your high school transcript. We will use a 100-point GPA, if available, and weighted, if available. If not, we're happy to consider a 4.0 GPA or similar and/or unweighted GPA.

What is Georgia Tech acceptance rate? ›

Can I get into Georgia Tech with 1500 SAT? ›

Because this school is quite selective, strong academic scores are critical to improving your chances of admission. If you're able to score a 1540 SAT or above, you'll have a very strong chance at getting in.

What is the lowest GPA Georgia Tech accepts? ›

The minimum GPA requirement is 3.0 on a 4.0 grade scale for College of Design, College of Sciences, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, and Scheller College of Business applicants.

Is Georgia Tech a big deal? ›

The Georgia Institute of Technology is one of the nation's top public research universities with nearly 40,000 students who study in person at the main campus in Atlanta, at Georgia Tech-Lorraine in France, at Georgia Tech-Shenzhen in China, as well as through distance and online learning.

Is Georgia Tech Ivy League? ›

Georgia Tech offers the unparalleled quality of an Ivy League education within a public university. The Institute's technologically-focused curriculum earns consistently strong rankings by national publications.

Should I accept a waitlist spot? ›

Waitlisted students can accept or reject the offer presented by the college. However, don't take up a spot on the list if you're not planning on attending the school anymore. You'd be taking the spot away from another student who may be more interested.

What are the chances of getting accepted if you are waitlisted? ›

While many colleges will waitlist hundreds or even thousands of students, not all of those students will accept a spot on the waitlist, making the pool, and the chances of getting in, slightly better in some cases. According to NACAC, 20% of all students who chose to remain on waitlists were ultimately admitted.

How do they decide who gets off the waitlist? ›

If you rank higher, you'll have a greater chance of getting off the waitlist. But some colleges may neither rank waitlisted students nor accept them by priority. Individual colleges may take a more holistic approach. They may make their decision based on factors such as which majors they want represented.

Does Georgia Tech favor in state students? ›

In addition, as a public university, we are committed to serving our state, so we intentionally select around 60 percent of our undergraduate students from the state of Georgia, 30 percent from out of state and 10 percent from outside the country.

How long does it take to hear back from Georgia Tech? ›

If you're a Georgia student who applies by October 15, you will get your decision by mid-December. If you live outside of Georgia and apply by November 2, you'll get your decision by early January.

Does early action increase chances? ›

Admission odds

Generally speaking, early action programs do not significantly increase your child's odds of getting into colleges, especially at highly selective schools. They simply allow your child to find out sooner whether or not they've gotten in.

Do rejection letters come first? ›

Most commonly, no, colleges do not send rejection letters before sending acceptance letters. Acceptance, waitlist and rejection letters are usually sent to applicants around the same time.

What day do most college decisions come out? ›

When Do Early Action Decisions Come Out? Most colleges notify Early Decision and Early Action applicants of admission around December 15. Because of the usual deadlines for applications, this means that if a student is rejected by their ED college, there are only about two weeks left to send in other applications.

Do colleges check your social media? ›

Yes, colleges can look at the public version of your social media accounts, but they don't have some sort of secret, government-like power to access your private information. It's much more likely that your social media behavior would only be brought to their attention if it causes a stir.

What is Georgia Tech most known for? ›

Georgia Tech's engineering and computing Colleges are the largest and among the highest-ranked in the nation, and the Institute also offers outstanding programs in business, design, liberal arts, and sciences.

What is the hardest college to get into? ›

Top 10 Hardest Colleges to Get Into
  1. Harvard. Cambridge, MA. 3.19%
  2. Columbia. New York, NY. 3.73%
  3. Caltech. Pasadena, CA. 3.92%*
  4. Stanford. Stanford, CA. 3.95%*
  5. MIT. Cambridge, MA. 3.96%
  6. Princeton. Princeton, NJ. 4.38%*
  7. Yale. New Haven, CT. 4.47%
  8. Brown. Providence, RI. 5.03%

What academics is Georgia Tech known for? ›

Academic Excellence
  • Georgia Tech is ranked #4 in Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs. ...
  • Scheller College of Business ranks #19 among all Undergraduate Business Programs and #16 for their Part-Time MBA (Source: U.S. News & World Report).

Is Georgia Tech selective? ›

Georgia Tech admissions is very selective with an acceptance rate of 21%. Students that get into Georgia Tech have an average SAT score between 1370-1530 or an average ACT score of 31-35.

Is a 1510 good for Georgia Tech? ›

Applicants with a composite SAT score of 1510 or higher will have particularly competitive chances at Georgia Tech.

Is Georgia Tech requiring SAT for 2023? ›

If you are admitted and choose to enroll at Georgia Tech, you will need to submit official test scores before attending orientation. Use the school codes below to submit your scores: SAT school code: 5248.

Which is better Georgia Tech or Caltech? ›

The same report lists Georgia Tech as the 12th best university in the country in terms of ROI and Caltech as the 10th.

How does Georgia Tech compare to MIT? ›

Georgia Tech is graded the first term, MIT is pass/fail. MIT has more graduate students than undergrad, Georgia Tech does not. Graduate education will vary based on topic of interest and the specific professor. The culture is different (New England versus Southern)

What tier school is Georgia Tech? ›

Georgia Tech is a tier one research university. This means our students have unique research advantages compared to most traditional liberal arts colleges. Discover our research areas and student projects.

Is getting waitlisted impressive? ›

Getting waitlisted at a college certainly isn't a bad thing—your application was good enough to not get rejected! —but it's definitely an uncomfortable place to be. After all, when you're on the college waitlist, you don't know whether you'll be admitted or not, and that alone is anxiety-inducing.

Is being waitlisted basically a rejection? ›

However, the school could not offer them a letter of acceptance at that time. Getting on a waitlist is not a rejection — waitlisted students still have a shot at earning admission to the school.

Is Waitlisted better than rejection? ›

Being waitlisted is better than being rejected because you still have some chance of getting into the school. According to the NACAC survey, the average acceptance rate across all institutions for those who choose to stay on the waitlist is 20% and 7% for selective institutions.

What is the most common major at Georgia Tech? ›

The most popular majors at Georgia Institute of Technology include: Engineering; Computer and Information Sciences and Support Services; Health Professions and Related Programs; Biological and Biomedical Sciences; Multi/Interdisciplinary Studies; Physical Sciences; Social Sciences; Visual and Performing Arts; ...

What is Georgia Tech's acceptance rate 2022? ›

Georgia Institute of Technology admissions is most selective with an acceptance rate of 18% and an early acceptance rate of 23.6%. Half the applicants admitted to Georgia Institute of Technology have an SAT score between 1360 and 1540 or an ACT score of 31 and 35.

Is it easier to get into Georgia Tech early action? ›

The early action acceptance rate into Georgia Tech is 39% for Early Action 1 (In-State students), and 12% for Early Action 2 (out-of-state and international students). Georgia Tech offers two Early Action rounds as part of its increased focus on diversity and in-state student enrollment goals.

Can I get into Georgia Tech without extracurriculars? ›

If you want to be part of the Georgia Tech enrollment, you should have a strong academic record and get involved in activities that are important to you early in high school. No Georgia Tech average GPA or Georgia Tech SAT scores will assure you a spot in the next incoming class.

How many applications did Georgia Tech get 2022? ›

Georgia Tech Acceptance Rate – Class of 2026

Out of 50,601 total applications submitted for a place in the 2022-23 freshman class; just 17% were accepted. This is slightly lower than the 18% clip for the Class of 2025.

Is Georgia Tech a top 20 school? ›

Georgia Institute of Technology is ranked #44 out of 443 National Universities. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence. Read more about how we rank schools.

What kind of students go to Georgia Tech? ›

Georgia Tech is looking for students who demonstrate intellectual curiosity and aren't afraid of a challenge! You should demonstrate success in the most rigorous curriculum available at your high school, which includes, but is not limited to: Advanced Placement (AP) International Baccalaureate (IB)

Is Caltech or Georgia Tech better? ›

The same report lists Georgia Tech as the 12th best university in the country in terms of ROI and Caltech as the 10th.

Does Georgia Tech give full rides? ›

Georgia Tech's prestigious four-year, full-ride Stamps President's Scholarship is offered annually to the top one percent of first-year students. The Provost Scholarship awards 40 first-year, non-resident students an out-of-state tuition waiver for eight semesters.

Can I get into Georgia Tech with a 1380 SAT? ›

There's no absolute SAT requirement at Georgia Tech, but they really want to see at least a 1390 to have a chance at being considered.

How many get off the Georgia Tech waitlist? ›

Class of 2026 Waitlist Notification Dates and Stats

Our analysis paints the following picture: The number of students admitted from the waitlist declined 46 percent year over year from 61,000 for the Class of 2024 to 33,000 for the Class of 2025.

Is Gatech an Ivy? ›

Georgia Tech offers the unparalleled quality of an Ivy League education within a public university. The Institute's technologically-focused curriculum earns consistently strong rankings by national publications.

Is Georgia Tech a public ivy? ›

For instance, if your child wants to study computer science, they should know that the University of Illinois–Urbana-Champaign and the University of Washington are widely regarded as top-notch in the field—on par with Ivies and Public Ivies like Cornell, Princeton, UCLA, and Georgia Tech.

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Otha Schamberger

Last Updated:

Views: 5673

Rating: 4.4 / 5 (55 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Otha Schamberger

Birthday: 1999-08-15

Address: Suite 490 606 Hammes Ferry, Carterhaven, IL 62290

Phone: +8557035444877

Job: Forward IT Agent

Hobby: Fishing, Flying, Jewelry making, Digital arts, Sand art, Parkour, tabletop games

Introduction: My name is Otha Schamberger, I am a vast, good, healthy, cheerful, energetic, gorgeous, magnificent person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.